Today I get back to work on my novel

Liza Monroy Writings

with occasional distractions from a short story I’m writing on the side. I found a new epigraph for the novel that I LOVE – and I can’t start before I have the perfect epigraph (another method of indulging distraction?). Sunlight falls across my keyboard just so, illuminating it and my fingertips just so as I compose, which the magical thinker in me chooses to interpret as a sign I’m finally getting back on track with this project.
Before I dive back in after taking this journaling break, I’m going to post the outtake epigraphs for The Distractions, because I like them, but as I learned from having a whole page filled with quotes at the beginning of an earlier draft of The Marriage Act — my editor cut them all, I may have salvaged maybe two of them — one epigraph is better than ten.
The outtakes:

“Nota bene.
It tells you.
You don’t tell it.”
-Joan Didion, “Why I Write”

“…what we find a distraction in our lives may be what fuels our curiosity and drives us to learn new things.”
-BH, student, “The Distractions: Writing In And About The Social Media Age,” UC Santa Cruz, Winter 2017

“If you allow yourself to get distracted, it is because what you are doing does not superimpose perfectly with what you want to be doing. And if you are not doing what you want to be doing, the things that will make you happy, you are wasting time.” – NM, student, “The Distractions: Writing In And About The Social Media Age,” UC Santa Cruz, Winter 2017

“I now live in my subject. My subject is my place in the world, and I live in my place. There is a sense in which I no longer ‘go to work.’ If I live in my place, which is my subject, then I am ‘at’ my work even when I am not working. It is ‘my’ work because I cannot escape it.”
—Wendell Berry, in “What Are People For?”